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Signs A Sugar Glider Is Sick

Know the signs of an ill sugar glider.

By Audrey Pavia
Posted: March 31, 2008, 5 a.m. EDT

Healthy Sugar Gliders
Healthy sugar gliders have bright eyes, a moist pink nose, pink gums and patagium, the furred gliding membrane that stretches from the wrists to the ankles. They have good gripping ability with all four feet and good activity levels. Their fur is smooth and free of parasites. They have clear, smooth ear canals, good elasticity of the gliding membrane and a good appetite. Stools are firm and not loose.

Healthy sugar gliders sleep during the daylight hours and usually become active at dusk and stay active during the night. Healthy sugar gliders eagerly forage for food, climb, play and scurry about their enclosure.

Signs of Illness
If you observe the following signs in your sugar glider, take it in to a veterinarian.

  • Prolonged sleeping up to 16 hours a day
  • Reluctance to come out of the nest box
  • Refusal to climb or explore the enclosure
  • Not wanting to be handled
  • Poor appetite
  • Weakness or dragging of hind limbs
  • Increased breathing rates
  • Seizures
  • Thin body condition
  • Distended abdomen
  • Loose stools
  • White spots in the eyes
  • Discharge from eyes, nose, ears or genital area
  • Frequent scratching

     

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