Bookmark and Share
Your E-mail:
Where does your sugar glider seem to most enjoy you petting him or her (if you have multiple sugar gliders or owned sugar gliders in the past, answer for the one you have owned the longest)?
Printer Friendly Bookmark and 

Share

Chinchilla Fur Facts

Things to know about caring for your chinchilla's coat.

By Marty Hull, D.D.S. & Amanda Martin

Chinchillas are instinctively clean and practically odorless if dust-bathed regularly (two to three times per week). The dust bath removed excess dirt and oil buildup from their coats. Tolling in the dust is relaxing and chinchillas often nap afterward. Dust-bath houses are available or rectangular glass or metal baking dishes may be used.

All chinchillas shed year-round, with increased fur loss during spring and summers. If your chin ingests excess fur while self-grooming, intestinal blockages may result. Some chins enjoy a gentle combing and will fall asleep on your lap.

Shedding hair tends to drop off chinchillas with thinner coats, so they only require infrequent combing. Chinchillas with thicker, cottony coats need regular grooming because shed hair tends to accumulate and form mats in the coat. Matted fur prevents effective dust bathing, so excess body oil and dirt stays in the coat. If oil and dirt build up in the coat, the fur clumps and separates which causes the chinchillas to lose more body heat and makes it more vulnerable to illness. An unclean coat also makes a chinchilla prone to skin disease and irritation.

As chinchillas jump around their cage, hay, dust bath materials, droppings and litter can escape through the bars despite the best guard strips. Depending on your chinchilla’s habits, occasionally some urine can leak onto the floor. Should your chinchilla have diarrhea, its cage can become very messy until the episode passes. If this occurs, scrape off and clean all the affected areas. You must frequently vacuum, sweep and/or dust around the cage area.

 Give us your opinion on
Chinchilla Fur Facts

Submit a Comment   Join Club
Earn 1,000 points! What's this?
Reader Comments
When you really love an animal you don't get rid of them simply because they bite you. My hamster bit me and drew blood and I took that as a sign okay I need to give it some space and let it get used to its surroundings a bit longer. Afterwhile I taught it not to bite me by pulling my fingers away every time it went in for the kill.

I suggest just giving it back to the petstore. Your love for an animal should be unconditional just like your family. Wouldn't recommend you get any other pets either because who knows they might bite and then you will probably have to return them too.
Louise, Stafford, VA
Posted: 8/24/2012 12:33:30 PM
The artice is excellent. We received the Chin as a gift and know next to nothing about careing for it. Thanks.
Barbara, Auburn, NY
Posted: 2/7/2012 7:16:44 AM
Just got a new female chin two weeks ago and she is totally wild. Today she bit me on both hands and drew a great deal of blood. We have another chin who is totally the love of our lives and gentle and loving. We show her respect, no pickups if she resists or barks and treat her the same as the other, but she is not responding. I am ready to take her back to the pet store and get another pet. Any suggestions.
sharon, Bellevue, WA
Posted: 11/27/2009 7:52:49 PM
View Current Comments

Rabbits USA
Rabbits USA
Complete Care Made Easy: Gerbils
Critters USA
Complete Care Made Easy: Ferrets
Ferrets USA
Top Products
d
 


Hi my name's Aggie, I live at the bridge now

Visit the Photo Gallery to
cast your vote!